Damien Cauzzo

2012 Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game European Champion

“My knowledge of Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game was greatly improved by the friends and competitors I have faced in interesting and tough games and by the long conversations we have shared about cards, useless combos, and ways of winning a game with Premature Detonation. They kept this game intense all these years, and I’m truly grateful to them all.”


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Who is Damien Cauzzo?

Damien began playing Call of Cthulhu in 2005, during the game’s CCG era. He started serving as a judge and tournament organizer for the community in Liège, Belgium when the game switched to its Living Card Game™ format. He has since continued in this role, except during the 2012 European Championships, which were organized by Fred Taton.

During that event, unflinching in the face of utter madness, Damien Cauzzo withstood the stiff competition and claimed the title of 2012 Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game European Champion. 

  • Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game European Champion – 2012

Other results:

  • Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game European Championship, 7th – 2011
  • Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game Belgian Championship (Unofficial), 8th – 2010
  • Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game Belgian Championship (Unofficial), 1st – 2009
  • Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game Belgian Championship (Unofficial), 6th – 2006

In His Own Words:

I was born in Belo Horizonte, Brazil in 1983. I lived a few years in Chile and the rest in Belgium, and I’m working in group dynamics and social psychology.

My hobbies are concentrated between Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game and A Game of Thrones: The Card Game, but I’ve dabbled in other things like skirmish wargames and Hell Dorado. Sadly, I’m the kind of guy that automatically takes the role of judge and tournament organizer, and I’ve been the tournament organizer for nearly all the games I have played since 2003.

On Preparing for High-Level Events:

Keep a rested mind, sharp and cool. I buy the latest Asylum Packs for Francesco (Konx), then return to my apartment thirty minutes before the tournament launches because I forgot to bring them. Sharp mind, I told you. It’s also key to have a good car…

Honestly, there are not a ton of things I do before a high-level event. I try to guess which types of decks I'll likely face (and the people behind them), and I build a deck that can cope with most of them. It’s different building a deck for tournaments than it is for casual play. For the European Championship, I knew I would face seven opponents, so the tactic during my deck-building phase was to avoid focusing in a one-way strategy, but to be good enough to counter my opponents’ decks during tight play and, more importantly, in a polyvalent and recursive way. I’m still not sure whether it is a good idea or not to play Snow Graves (At the Mountains of Madness, 15) against a resurrection deck. Your opponent is probably prepared to face your Snow Graves (or you are very lucky), and he likely has some ways to cycle some support destruction cards. If you can’t do the same thing, you are just wasting time and resources for nothing.
 
In the end, the most important things for high-level events are good and creative sparring partners during the rest of the year. My knowledge of
Call of Cthulhu: The Card Game was greatly improved by the friends and competitors I have faced in interesting and tough games and by the long conversations we have shared about cards, useless combos, and ways of winning a game with Premature Detonation (Never Night, 85). They kept this game intense all these years, and I’m truly grateful to them all.

Why Cthulhu Is His Favorite Faction:

I like the Cthulhu faction for its destructive power. There is nothing better than playing Deep One Assault (Core Set, 56) to destroy an opponent's irritating character. You never feel distraught against an invulnerable character, and it’s clearly more efficient than a lame exhaust or skill-reduction effect.

Another faction I often play is Hastur. The polyvalence as well as the strength of the faction’s numerous power cards makes it, in my opinion, compulsory to play this faction in competitive play. Still, I try to play with every faction to maintain a good level of knowledge of all the factions and their cards.

On the 2012 European Championship:

I played against Minas Gessis, a friend from Liège. We met once in the tournament’s Swiss rounds, so we knew each other's decks. He was playing a rush deck using Agency and Cthulhu with low-cost characters, a lot of destructive cards, and the Khopesh of the Abyss (The Shifting Sands, 16), just to make sure he would get enough destructive power. I won the qualification match, but it was quite tough. For this final encounter, I was afraid he would make an opening as aggressive as the one he launched in our first match.

However, his first turn was strangely calm. He played Paul LeMond (Core Set, 4) and nothing really aggressive. Therefore, very early in the game, I already knew I had the advantage. By that, I mean that my deck had a lot of cards that could return themselves to play if they were destroyed – Descendant of Eibon (The Terror of the Tides, 75), Naaginn (Touched by the Abyss, 105), and Stygian Eye (Into Tartarus, 96) – or that could be rerturned by Marcus Jamburg (Words of Power, 40). Because he wasn’t very aggressive early, I felt confident that I would endure the destructive part of his deck without too much trouble and could counter-attack pretty well.

Indeed, a few turns later, I put into play an Ice Shaft (Never Night, 83) and Marcus Jamburg. At this stage, I already had more characters than him. I played a Stygian Eye twice and used a Deep One Assault to blast away his Agency Bodyguard (Journey to Unknown Kadath, 101), who had a brand new Khopesh attached. Classic, and efficient. Then I brought a Descendant of Eibon into play, and Marcus took my third story.

 

 

 

 

 

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